Connect with us

Equipment

Blade vs. mallet: What style putters do the top-50 players in the world use? (2022 update)

Published

on

Four years ago, I wrote an article where I analyzed the putters that the top-50 players in the world were using, and the top-50 players in strokes gained: putting. I wanted to find out whether more mallet-style putters, or blade-style putters, were being used by the world’s best.

In 2018, I found that 44 percent of the top-50 players in the Official World Golf Rankings were using mallet style putters, and 56 percent of the top-50 in strokes gained: putting were using mallet putters.

Flash forward to 2022, and it would seem that more and more top golfers are switching into mallet putters – Scottie Scheffler, for example, just switched into a mallet putter after using a blade-style putter throughout his career.

What are the actual numbers, though? Are more top PGA Tour players really using mallet putters these days, or is the shift overblown?

I wanted to find out.

For my research, I simply went through the most recent GolfWRX WITB photos, and the most recent photos on Getty Images, to figure out what style putter each player in the Top-50 in the OWGR is using, as well as each Top-50 player in strokes gained: putting on the PGA Tour for the 2021-22 season.

Below are the results:

Top-50 in OWGR: Blade or Mallet?

Mallet putter users, 62 percent (31 out of 50)

Rory McIlroy’s TaylorMade Spider Tour mallet putter

Rory McIlroy (No. 1: TaylorMade Spider Tour Hydroblast)

Scottie Scheffler (No. 2: Scotty Cameron T-5.5 Proto)

Patrick Cantlay (No. 4: Scotty Cameron T5 Proto)

Jon Rahm (N0. 5: Odyssey Rossie S White Hot OG)

Xander Schauffele (No. 6: Odyssey O-Works #7 CH Red)

Will Zalatoris (No. 7: Scotty Cameron Circle T Phantom X T-11 Proto)

Justin Thomas (No. 8: Scotty Cameron T5 Proto Tour-Only custom)

Viktor Hovland (No. 11: Ping PLD DS 72)

Sam Burns (No. 12: Odyssey O-Works 7S)

Billy Horschel (No. 16: Ping PLD Sigma 2 Tyne 4)

Cameron Young (No. 17: Scotty Cameron T5 prototype)

Max Homa (No. 18: Scotty Cameron Phantom X T5.5 Prototype)

Sungjae Im (No. 20: Scotty Cameron Flowback 5 Prototype)

Shane Lowry: (No. 21: Odyssey DFX 2-ball)

Abraham Ancer (No. 23: Odyssey White Hot No. 5 Stroke Lab)

Keegan Bradley (No. 25: Odyssey Versa Jailbird)

Sepp Straka (No. 27: Odyssey Tuttle Stroke Lab)

Tyrrell Hatton (No. 28: Ping Vault Oslo)

Kevin Kisner (No. 29: Odyssey 2-Ball 11)

Dustin Johnson (No. 30: TaylorMade Spider GT Black)

Corey Conners (No. 31: Ping PLD Prototype)

Tom Hoge (No. 32: TaylorMade Spider X Hydroblast)

K.H. Lee (No. 33: Odyssey Works Versa 2-ball)

Adam Scott (No. 34: L.A.B. Golf Mezz.1 prototype)

Aaron Wise (No. 36: TaylorMade Ghost)

Brian Harman (No. 37: TaylorMade OS CB)

Daniel Berger (No. 43: TaylorMade Spider X Hydroblast)

Jason Kokrak (No. 44: Bettinardi Studio Stock 38)

Harold Varner III (No. 46: Odyssey White Hot OG 7S)

Seamus Power (No. 48: Ping PLD3 Mallet)

Harris English (No. 49: Ping Scottsdale Hohum)

Blade putter users, 38 percent (19 out of 50)

Tom Kim’s new custom Scotty Cameron blade-style putter

Cameron Smith (No. 3: Scotty Cameron 009M Prototype)

Collin Morikawa (No. 9: TaylorMade TP Soto)

Matt Fitzpatrick (No. 10: Bettinardi DASS Prototype)

Jordan Spieth (No. 13: Scotty Cameron 009 tour prototype)

Tony Finau (No. 14: Ping PLD Prototype)

Joohyung “Tom” Kim (No. 15: Scotty Cameron TourType GSS Prototype)

Hideki Matsuyama (No. 19: Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS)

Joaquin Niemann (No. 22: Prototype Ping PLD Anser)

Tommy Fleetwood (No. 24: TaylorMade TP Juno)

Ryan Fox (No. 26: Ping Anser 2D)

Thomas Pieters (No. 35: Scotty Cameron Squareback Select 2 Tour Only)

Talor Gooch (No. 38: Odyssey Tri-Hot Two)

Brooks Koepka (No. 39: Scotty Cameron Teryllium TNP2)

Kevin Na (No. 40: Odyssey Toulon Madison)

Kurt Kitayama (No. 41: Scotty Cameron Newport prototype)

Louis Oosthuizen (No. 42: Ping Vault 2.0 Voss)

Mito Pereira (No. 45: Ping Vault 2.0 Dale Anser Stealth)

Paul Casey (No. 47: Scotty Cameron 009M Prototype)

Alex Noren (No. 50: Odyssey O-Works 1W)

Top-50 in Strokes Gained: Putting

Mallet users: 70 percent (35 of 50 players)

Kelly Kraft’s custom Odyssey Versa 1-Ball Red prototype mallet

Lucas Herbert (No. 1: TaylorMade Spider X Hydroblast)

Denny McCarthy (No. 2: Scotty Cameron GoLo N7)

Tyrrell Hatton (No. 4: Ping Vault Oslo)

Beau Hossler (No. 5: Odyssey 2-Ball Ten)

Christiaan Bezuidenhout (No. 6: Odyssey White Hot OG #7)

Kelly Kraft (No. 7: Odyssey Versa 1-ball Red Prototype)

Kevin Kisner (No. 9: Odyssey 2-ball 11)

Sam Burns (No. 10: Odyssey O-Works 7S)

Martin Trainer (No. 12: Scotty Cameron Circle T Prototype Phantom T12)

Chesson Hadley (No. 13: Odyssey White Hot OG 2-Ball)

Mackenzie Hughes (No. 14: Ping Scottsdale TR Piper C)

Rory McIlroy (No. 16: TaylorMade Spider Tour Hydroblast)

Ian Poulter (No. 17: Scotty Cameron T-11 Proto)

Justin Rose (No. 20: Axis1 Rose Prototype)

Billy Horschel (No. 21: Ping PLD Sigma 2 Tyne 4)

Matthew Wolff (No. 23: TaylorMade GT Notchback)

Adam Long (No. 24: Scotty Cameron T5 Proto)

Viktor Hovland (No. 25: Ping PLD DS 72)

Max Homa (No. 27: Scotty Cameron Phantom X T5.5 Prototype)

Patrick Cantlay (T28: Scotty Cameron T5 Proto)

Jon Rahm (T28: Odyssey Rossie S White Hot OG)

Wyndham Clark (No. 31: Scotty Cameron T5 Proto)

Xander Schauffele (No. 32: Odyssey O-Works #7 CH Red)

Vince Whaley (No. 33: Odyssey White Hot OG #7)

Rory Sabbatini (No. 34: Scotty Cameron Flowback Prototype)

Austin Cook (T35: Ping Sigma G Tyne)

Sungjae Im (No. 37: Scotty Cameron Flowback 5 Prototype)

Andrew Putnam (No. 38: Odyssey Stroke Lab Black Rossie)

Sepp Straka (No. 39: Odyssey Tuttle Stroke Lab)

Seamus Power (No. 40: Ping PLD3 Mallet)

J.T. Poston (T41: Scotty Cameron GoLo 5 Black Tour Prototype)

Adam Scott (T41: L.A.B. Golf Mezz.1 prototype)

Troy Merritt (No. 43: Yes! C-Groove Mollie Tour)

Jason Kokrak (T46: Bettinardi Studio Stock 38)

Mark Hubbard (No. 50: Odyssey Metal X Milled #9HT)

Blade users: 30 percent (15 of 50)

Matthew Fitzpatrick’s custom Bettinardi blade-style putter

Brendon Todd (No. 3: Sik Pro C-Series)

Cameron Smith (No. 8: Scotty Cameron 009M Prototype)

Matt Kuchar (No. 11: Bettinardi Tour Department SS28 DASS)

Marc Leishman (No. 15: Odyssey Versa #6)

Alex Noren (No. 18: Odyssey O-Works 1W)

Maverick McNealy (No. 19: Toulon Stanford MM Custom)

Matt Fitzpatrick (No. 22: Bettinardi DASS Prototype)

Tommy Fleetwood (No. 26: TaylorMade TP Juno)

Patrick Rodgers (No. 30: Odyssey Toulon San Diego)

Seung-Yul Noh (T35: Scotty Cameron Select Prototype)

Scott Stallings (No. 44: Scotty Cameron Newport 2.6 Prototype)

Brooks Koepka (No. 45: Scotty Cameron Teryllium TNP2)

Justin Lower (T46: PXG Prototype)

Richy Werenski (No. 48: Scotty Cameron Circle T Prototype)

Patrick Reed (No. 49: Odyssey White Hot Pro #3)

Conclusion

In 2018, 44 percent of the top-50 players in the Official World Golf Rankings were using mallet style putters, and 56 percent of the top-50 in strokes gained: putting were using mallet putters.

In 2022, 62 percent of the top-50 players in the OWGR use mallet style putters, and 70 percent of the top-50 in strokes gained: putting were using mallet style putters.

What do you think this means?

To me, it means that each golfer should try as many putters as possible – under the supervision of a professional fitter or local club professional – and find the best possible putter to fit their stroke style and preferences.

Your Reaction?
  • 158
  • LEGIT34
  • WOW9
  • LOL1
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK11

He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Tom K

    Oct 30, 2022 at 9:45 pm

    Blade that isn’t too deep with a rounded back and flow neck is the way to go.

  2. GenoK

    Oct 28, 2022 at 7:45 pm

    I’m 73 now, with an 18hdcp. My Tommy Armour Impact #3 was tested against the top mallets on Tour in 2019 and came in 2nd overall. Retail $129 On sale $99 I had a $20 coupon…net price $79. Putting has always been my default position and why my game is still respectable. I wasn’t looking to change, but the testers loved the putter, I loved the price and three putts I’ve had with it have been rare.

  3. Peter

    Oct 28, 2022 at 5:09 pm

    Confusing to me , in the article it says mallet style putters to mallet putters? I thought it was supposed to be compared to blade putters
    Vs. Mallet. I must of missed something.

  4. Tom Philbeck

    Oct 28, 2022 at 8:38 am

    Compare MOI numbers for blade vs. mallet and your article would be really worth reading

    • Jeff B

      Oct 28, 2022 at 3:21 pm

      The MOI for Anser2 style blade is higher than many small/mid mallets. Standard Newport 2 is around 4000, some like Odyssey Tri-Hot getting to 5000. Small mallets like Rossie, 2-Ball, #7 in the range of 3000-3500.

  5. Juan

    Oct 27, 2022 at 7:55 pm

    Nice article. Scheffler’s rank is confusing because he got there with a blade. In his first tourney with a mallet he lost 4.5 strokes putting to the field.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Equipment

‘Engineered for extreme backspin’ – Mizuno unveils new S23 wedges

Published

on

Mizuno has today unveiled its new S23 wedges, which the manufacturer says are “comprehensively engineered for extreme backspin.”

The wedges are designed to combine the precision and playing profile of a player’s bladed wedge with the aggressive performance of a toe-weighted design and feature a centralized sweet spot for maximum control.

The S23 wedges showcase a shorter hosel and a heel-orientated cavity allowing greater mass to be pushed towards the toe. This creates a centred sweet spot, as opposed to a heel-side location in conventional wedges. 

The centred sweet spot is designed to contribute to longer impact time, less head deflection and higher spin from both full and partial shots.

“That check and spin you see from the pros isn’t purely because of newer grooves – most of us don’t have the consistency of strike to get that kind of action. For the vast majority, a centralised sweet spot makes it much easier to find and get that repetitive action.” – David Llewellyn, Director of R&D for Mizuno

The S23 wedges are One-piece Grain Flow Forged HD at Mizuno’s facility in Hiroshima, Japan – where Mizuno irons have been produced since 1968. They have a Tour-ready design with a player’s preferred, versatile look at address. But, with weight pushed to the toe, a partial heel cavity and a short hosel, they offer a centralised sweet spot designed to offer a more consistent strike and reliable high-spin numbers.

The wedges offer a loft-specific profile with stronger lofts featuring a tear-drop straight edge, flowing into a more rounded lob wedge, with grinds to suit throughout.

The precise grooves in the S23 wedges are quad-cut milled and loft specific, cut into Boron infused 1025 mild carbon steel for a longer effective lifespan. In addition, Mizuno’s HydroFlow Micro Grooves are laser etched to release moisture in a bid to reduce spin drop-off in wet conditions.

The S23 wedges come in either a white satin brush chrome or copper cobalt finish and will be in retail from February 2023 at a price of $160 per wedge.

Your Reaction?
  • 2
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Equipment

GolfWRX Launch Report: Mizuno ST-Z 230, ST-X 230 drivers, fairway wood, hybrid

Published

on

What you need to know: The product of Mizuno’s Speed Technology (ST) Metalwood Project — four years of rapid-fire metalwoods development — 2023 Mizuno ST-Z 230, ST-X 230, and ST-PLTNM feature the centerpiece Cortech Chamber, within which a steel weight is positioned for increased ball speed and spin reduction. The technology extends to the ST-Z 230 fairway wood and hybrid as well.

Mizuno ST-Z 230, ST-X 230: What’s new, key technology

Cortech Chamber: Through slot provides additional COR area by providing sole flex filled with elastomeric TPU material for additional flexure and face stress reduction. Inside the TPU is a stainless steel weight, which is positioned close to the clubface for increased speed and spin reduction. Also contributes to a solid feeling at impact.

SAT 2041 Forged Beta Titanium Face: More flexible and stronger than 6-4 titanium.

Additional model details

ST-Z 230

  • Billed as a “straight, stable, and low spinning” driver. Designed for stability on off-center hits.
  • Engineers focused on positioning CG location being as close as possible to the Z-axis or neutral axis for lower spin, straight performance, and higher MOI.
  • Forged SAT 2041 Beta Ti face, aided by the Cortech Chamber, enhances ball speed and reduces spin
  • 14-gram back weight
  • Shallower CG for a more penetrating ball flight

ST-X 230

  • Billed as a “more workable, mild draw-biased” driver
  • Higher spinning, higher launching than ST-Z 230
  • Deeper CG and shorter CG distance for a balance of workability in both directions
  • 14-gram heel weight
  • Toe side composite for shorter CG to shaft axis distance
  • More rounded, deeper profile

ST-X PLTNM 230

  • An ultra lightweight driver for slower swing speeds
  • High launching
  • Draw biased
  • The ST-X PLTNM is 30g lighter overall than any possible custom option of the ST-X 230
  • High spec Helium Platinum Shaft and lightweight grip

What Mizuno says

“Our player testing over the years shows that placing extra weight close to the face results in faster ball speeds and low spin rates,” says David Llewellyn, Director of R&D for Mizuno. “We’ve been steadily working towards the CORTECH Chamber, which is incredibly effective at that job. Encasing the steel weight within the TPU Chamber means that we’re moving weight close to the face at the same time as creating an additional source of energy. Steel is twice the density of Titanium but won’t weld directly, which is where the TPU has a second role.”

More photos

ST-Z 230

ST-X 230

ST-Z 230 Fairway Wood

  • A mid-low spinning, high launching, adjustable fairway wood
  • Mid-sized and playable for all levels
  • High energy MAS1C steel face boosted by Mizuno’s Cortech Chamber
  • The carbon composite crown for a low center of gravity
  • Quick Switch hosel offers 4 degrees of adjustability

ST-Z 230 Hybrid

  • A mid-low spinning, high launching, adjustable hybrid
  • High energy MAS1C steel face boosted by Mizuno’s Cortech Chamber
  • Waffle crown, thick sole weight create a deep center of gravity for high launch
  • With respect to the CLK, the ST-Z 230 is slightly larger

Price, specs, availability

Drivers

ST-Z

Availability: Right Hand – 9.5 and 10.5 degrees
Left hand – 9.5 degrees only

ST-X

Availability: Right Hand – 9.5, 10.5, and 12 degrees
Left hand – 9.5 degrees only

Fairway wood

Right Hand – 3 wood (15) and 5 wood (18)
Left hand – 3 wood (15)

Hybrid

Availability: Right Hand – 2H (16), 3H (19), 4H (22) and 5H (25)
Left Hand – 3H (19) and 4H (22)

Pricing

ST-Z 230 Driver / ST-X 230 Driver: $499.95
ST-Z 230 PLTNM Driver: $549.95
ST-Z 230 Fairway Woods: $299.95

At retail: February

Your Reaction?
  • 6
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Equipment

Titleist adds low-bounce T Grind to its Vokey Design SM9 family

Published

on

Titleist has today added the low-bounce T Grind to its Vokey Design SM9 lineup.

Previously available only as a WedgeWorks custom order, the T Grind will now be widely available in both stock and custom options as an extension to the existing SM9 family, being offered in SM9 58.04T and 60.04T models.

As a low-bounce wedge with a narrow crescent surface and wider back flange, the T grind is designed to allow for shot making under any condition. Compared to the L Grind, SM9’s other low-bounce option, the T Grind features a narrower forward sole and more aggressive heel, toe and trailing edge relief.

“Wedge play is an art, and the T Grind brings out the best in the artist. The leading edge stays low to the playing surface as the wedge is rotated, which allows the golfer to hit a variety of shots from tight lies. This is the wedge that really made Vokey Grinds an important part of our process – and is still a great option to this day.” – Bob Vokey

The new T Grind features a CG that has been raised vertically by adding weight to the topline design, where a tapered pad at the back of the toe helps align the CG properly without being visible from the playing position – promoting a more controlled ball flight and solid contact.

A new Spin Milled cutting process in the SM9 models – which includes tightening our allowable tolerances – produces consistently sharper grooves wedge after wedge in design for a higher, more consistent spin.

Specs, Availability & Pricing

  • Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S200
  • Grip: Golf Pride Tour Velvet 360 White
  • Lofts, Bounce 58.04T RH/LH, 60.04T RH/LH
  • Color Codes: Tour Chrome, Brushed Steel, Jet Black finishes. Raw finish available for custom only.
  • Availability: March 10
  • Price: $179 (Steel), $195 (Graphite)
Your Reaction?
  • 1
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending